Advertisement

Canadian Ophthalmological Society Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Diabetic Retinopathy – Executive Summary

      Introduction

      The Canadian Ophthalmological Society Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Diabetic Retinopathy were developed to provide guidance to Canadian ophthalmologists regarding the management of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Readers are directed to the full guideline document, available online at http://www.canadianjournalofophthalmology.ca/, for more detail and references.

      Methodology

      These guidelines were systematically developed and based on a thorough consideration of the medical literature and clinical experience. The document highlights key points from the data in 2 ways. “Key Messages” are key inferences from the dataset and, in some cases, extrapolations from it. While considered important, they are not assigned an evidence-based weighting. “Recommendations” are evidence-based statements regarding patient management and are supported by the cited literature. All recommendations were formulated using the best available evidence, with consideration given to the health benefits, risks and side effects of interventions. The references used to support recommendations were assigned a level of evidence based upon the criteria used by previous Canadian Ophthalmological Society guidelines and other national organizations' guidelines.
      Canadian Ophthalmological Society Clinical Practice Guideline Expert Committee
      Canadian Ophthalmological Society evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the periodic eye examination in adults in Canada.
      Canadian Ophthalmological Society Cataract Surgery Clinical Practice Guideline Expert Committee
      Canadian Ophthalmological Society evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for cataract surgery in the adult eye.
      Canadian Ophthalmological Society Glaucoma Clinical Practice Guideline Expert Committee
      Canadian Ophthalmological Society evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the management of glaucoma in the adult eye.
      Canadian Diabetes Association Clinical Practice Guideline Expert Committee
      Canadian Diabetes Association clinical practice guidelines for the prevention and management of diabetes in Canada.
      Canadian Hypertension Education Program
      2008 CHEP Recommendations for the Management of Hypertension.
      A summary of Key Messages and Recommendations can be found in Appendix A.

      Definitions

      DR refers to retinal changes induced by diabetes. It is subdivided into nonproliferative and proliferative stages, either of which may be associated with macular edema.

      Epidemiology

      In 2008, there were an estimated 2.4 million Canadians with diabetes. It is estimated that the prevalence could increase to 3.7 million by 2018/19. DR remains the leading cause of legal and functional blindness in people aged 25–75 years. The incidence and prevalence of DR will increase as the incidence and prevalence of diabetes increase, which presents important implications for healthcare human resources and costs. DR is directly correlated to age, duration of diabetes, elevated A1C, hypertension, non-white ethnicity and insulin use. Moreover, Aboriginal populations in Canada are disproportionately affected by diabetes and DR; thus, strategies are needed to provide culturally appropriate programs to prevent, screen and treat diabetes and DR in these populations.
      • Naqshbandi M.
      • Harris S.B.
      • Esler J.G.
      • Antwi-Nsiah F.
      Global complication rates of type 2 diabetes in Indigenous peoples: A comprehensive review.
      • Macaulay A.C.
      • Montour L.T.
      • Adelson N.
      Prevalence of diabetic and atherosclerotic complications among Mohawk Indians of Kahnawake, PQ.

      Screening

      Screening plays an important role in early detection and intervention to prevent the progression of DR. Unfortunately, compliance with recommended screening is low in the Canadian population.
      • Sloan F.A.
      • Brown D.S.
      • Carlisle E.S.
      • Picone G.A.
      • Lee P.P.
      Monitoring visual status: why patients do or do not comply with practice guidelines.
      • Boucher M.C.
      • Desroches G.
      • Garcia-Salinas R.
      • et al.
      Teleophthalmology screening for diabetic retinopathy through mobile imaging units within Canada.
      • Rudnisky C.J.
      • Tennant M.T.S.
      • Johnson J.A.
      • Balko S.U.
      Diabetes and eye disease in Alberta.
      It is hoped that improvement of the healthcare system infrastructure and better coordination and cooperation across a wide range of professions and organizations will help to ensure better availability of quality services to people with diabetes.
      Provided adequate sensitivity and specificity are maintained, clinical examination to detect the presence and severity of DR may be achieved through dilated retinal examination by slit lamp biomicroscopy, or retinal photography. The use of new technologies such as digital cameras and teleophthalmology can improve access to screening.
      Screening for DR in individuals with type 1 diabetes diagnosed following puberty should be initiated 5 years following diagnosis of diabetes.
      • Klein R.
      • Klein B.
      • Moss S.
      • Davis M.D.
      • DeMets D.L.
      The Wisconsin epidemiologic study of diabetic retinopathy II. Prevalence and risk of diabetic retinopathy when age at diagnosis is less than 30 years.
      • Raman V.
      • Campbell F.
      • Holland P.
      • et al.
      Retinopathy screening in children and adolescents with diabetes.
      • Goldstein D.E.
      • Blinder K.J.
      • Ide C.H.
      • et al.
      Glycemic control and development of retinopathy in youth-onset insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus Results of a 12-year longitudinal study.
      For individuals diagnosed with type 1 diabetes before puberty, screening for DR should be initiated at puberty, unless there are other considerations that would suggest the need for an earlier exam. In individuals with type 2 diabetes, screening should be initiated at the time of diagnosis of diabetes.
      • Klein R.
      • Klein B.
      • Moss S.
      • Davis M.D.
      • DeMets D.L.
      The Wisconsin epidemiologic study of diabetic retinopathy III. Prevalence and risk of diabetic retinopathy when age at diagnosis is 30 or more years.
      • Klein R.
      • Klein B.E.
      • Moss S.E.
      • et al.
      The Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of diabetic retinopathy X. Four-year incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy when age at diagnosis is 30 years or more.
      Subsequent evaluation for progression of DR in individuals depends on the level of retinopathy: in those who do not show evidence of retinopathy, evaluation should occur every year in those with type 1 diabetes
      • Mohamed Q.
      • Gillies M.C.
      • Wong T.Y.
      Management of diabetic retinopathy: a systematic review.
      and every 1–2 years in those with type 2 diabetes
      • Misra A.
      • Bachmann M.O.
      • Greenwood R.H.
      • et al.
      Trends in yield and effects of screening intervals during 17 years of a large UK community-based diabetic retinopathy screening programme.
      • Mitchell P.
      The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy: a study of 1300 diabetics from Newcastle and the Hunter Valley.
      depending on anticipated compliance. Timely and appropriate care needs to be ensured after detection of DR.

      Telehealth and Teleophthalmology

      The geography and demographics of Canada are particularly suited to the attributes of teleophthalmology. Both DR and diabetic macular edema (DME) can be detected with a high level of sensitivity and specificity using properly developed teleophthalmology platforms. However, appropriate standards need to be upheld for all aspects of a teleophthalmology program including image acquisition, image evaluation, client scheduling and management and storage of clients' information, and image data.
      • Tennant M.T.
      • Greve M.D.
      • Rudnisky C.J.
      • Hillson T.R.
      • Hinz B.J.
      Identification of diabetic retinopathy by stereoscopic digital imaging via teleophthalmology: a comparison to slide film.
      • Boucher M.C.
      • Gresset J.A.
      • Angioi K.
      • Olivier S.
      Effectiveness and safety of screening for diabetic retinopathy with two nonmydriatic digital images compared with the seven standard stereoscopic photographic fields.
      • Rudnisky C.J.
      • Tennant M.T.
      • Weis E.
      • Ting A.
      • Hinz B.J.
      • Greve M.D.
      Web-based grading of compressed stereoscopic digital photography versus standard slide film photography for the diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy.

      Risk Factors For And Prevention Of Progression Of Diabetic Retinopathy

      Patients with diabetes benefit from care provided by a multidisciplinary team. While diabetes management is primarily the responsibility of the patient's family doctor or endocrinologist, the ophthalmologist should discuss the importance of maintaining good control of blood glucose and blood pressure with patients at regular intervals.

      Treatment Modalities

      Treatment regimens for patients presenting with DR traditionally includes laser (focal, grid, and panretinal), which has been demonstrated to be effective for selected patients in the Diabetic Retinopathy Study and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study. More recently, intraocular steroid and intraocular vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors have been used alone or as a supplement to laser. There is now high-level evidence that the use of VEGF inhibitors in conjunction with focal laser for the treatment of DME is superior to the use of laser alone.
      • Nguyen Q.D.
      • Shah S.M.
      • Khwaja A.A.
      • et al.
      READ-2 Study Group
      Two-year outcomes of the ranibizumab for edema of the macula in diabetes (READ-2) study.
      • Mitchell P.
      • Bandello F.
      • Schmidt-Erfurth U.
      • et al.
      RESTORE study group
      The RESTORE study: ranibizumab monotherapy or combined with laser versus laser monotherapy for diabetic macular edema.
      • Michaelides M.
      • Kaines A.
      • Hamilton R.D.
      • Fraser-Bell S.
      • et al.
      A prospective randomized trial of intravitreal bevacizumab or laser therapy in the management of diabetic macular edema (BOLT study) 12-month data: report 2.
      Vitrectomy has been shown to be superior to observation in certain forms of nonclearing vitreous hemorrhage
      Diabetic Retinopathy Vitrectomy Study Research Group
      Early vitrectomy for severe vitreous hemorrhage in diabetic retinopathy. Two-year results of a randomized trial. Diabetic Retinopathy Vitrectomy Study report 2.
      and remains the only way to remove fibrous proliferation and relieve tractional detachment, although the visual results of this surgery are mixed. The utility of vitrectomy to treat DME remains controversial, although it can be of particular benefit in eyes with vitreomacular traction.
      • Haller J.A.
      • Qin H.
      • Apte R.S.
      • et al.
      Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network Writing Committee
      Vitrectomy outcomes in eyes with diabetic macular edema and vitreomacular traction.
      • Flaxel C.J.
      • Edwards A.R.
      • Aiello L.P.
      • et al.
      Factors associated with visual acuity outcomes after vitrectomy for diabetic macular edema: diabetic retinopathy clinical research network.

      Pregnancy

      There is insufficient evidence at this time to determine the safety of intraocular VEGF inhibitors in pregnancy. Thus, caution should be exercised in women who are pregnant or could become pregnant, and women of child-bearing age should be specifically questioned about possible pregnancy. Women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who are planning a pregnancy should undergo an ophthalmic evaluation by an eye care specialist. Repeat assessments should be performed during the first trimester and as indicated by the stage of retinopathy and the rate of progression during the remainder of pregnancy and through the first year postpartum.
      Diabetes Control and Complications Trial Research Group
      Effect of pregnancy on microvascular complications in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial.
      Diabetes Control and Complication Trial Research Group
      Early worsening of diabetic retinopathy in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial.

      Neovascularization of The Iris

      In patients with DR and iris neovascularization or neovascular glaucoma, consideration should be given to the use of an intraocular VEGF inhibitor injection in conjunction with laser panretinal photocoagulation to produce regression of the neovasularization and reduce the risk of long-term glaucoma.
      • Sugimoto Y.
      • Mochizuki H.
      • Okumichi H.
      • Takumida M.
      • Takamatsu M.
      • Kawamata S.
      • Kiuchi Y.
      Effect of intravitreal bevacizumab on iris vessels in neovascular glaucoma patients.
      • Falavarjani K.G.
      • Modarres M.
      • Nazari H.
      Therapeutic effect of bevacizumab injected into the silicone oil in eyes with neovascular glaucoma after vitrectomy for advanced diabetic retinopathy.
      • Beutel J.
      • Peters S.
      • Lüke M.
      • Aisenbrey S.
      • Szurman P.
      • Spitzer M.S.
      • et al.
      Bevacizumab Study Group
      Bevacizumab as adjuvant for neovascular glaucoma.
      • Lupinacci A.P.
      • Calzada J.I.
      • Rafieetery M.
      • Charles S.
      • Netland P.A.
      Clinical outcomes of patients with anterior segment neovascularization treated with or without intraocular bevacizumab.

      Economic Considerations

      Although a complete discussion of the cost of DR and the cost-effectiveness of screening and management is beyond the scope of this clinical practice guideline, the available evidence suggests that there is a considerable economic benefit to screening and early treatment of DR. Diabetes has reached epidemic proportions in some Canadian populations and can be expected to have a consistent impact on costs associated with DR in the future.
      • Maberley D.
      • Walker H.
      • Koushik A.
      • Cruess A.
      Screening for diabetic retinopathy in James Bay, Ontario: a cost-effectiveness analysis.
      • Polak B.C.
      • Crijns H.
      • Casparie A.F.
      • Niessen L.W.
      Cost-effectiveness of glycemic control and ophthalmological care in diabetic retinopathy.

      Support

      Funding for the development of this guideline was provided by the Canadian Ophthalmological Society and by the following sponsors (in alphabetical order) in the form of unrestricted educational grants: Alcon Canada Inc., Allergan Canada Inc, AMO, Novartis Canada Inc., Pfizer Canada Inc. Neither industry nor government was involved in the decision to publish guidelines, in the choice of guideline, or in any aspect of guideline development.

      Guide de pratique clinique factuelle de la Société canadienne d'ophtalmologie pour la gestion de la rétinopathie diabétique – Sommaire de direction

      Comité d'experts du Guide de pratique clinique de la Société canadienne d'ophtalmologie pour la rétinopathie diabétique: Philip Hooper, MD, FRCSC (président); Marie Carole Boucher, MD, CSPQ, FRCS; Alan Cruess, MD, FRCSC; Keith G. Dawson, MD, PhD, FRCPC; Walter Delpero, MD, FRCSC; Mark Greve, MD, FRCSC; Vladimir Kozousek, MD, MPH, FRCSC; Wai-Ching Lam, MD, FRCSC; David A.L. Maberley, MD, FRCSC, MSc (Epid)

      Introduction

      Le Guide de pratique clinique factuelle de la Société canadienne d'ophtalmologie pour la gestion de la rétinopathie diabétique a pour objet de doter les ophtalmologistes canadiens d'un guide de gestion de la rétinopathie diabétique (RD). Les lecteurs trouveront plus de détails et les références dans le document complet en ligne au http://www.canadianjournalofophthalmology.ca/.

      Méthodologie

      Ces lignes directrices ont été élaborées systématiquement à partir d'un examen minutieux de la littérature médicale et de l'expérience clinique. Le document souligne les principaux points découlant des données de deux manières différentes. Les « Messages clés » sont les principales inférences de l'ensemble des données et, dans certains cas, des extrapolations qu'on en tire. Malgré leur importance, ils n'ont pas un poids fondé sur les données probantes. Les « Recommandations » sont des énoncés fondés sur des données probantes, portant sur la gestion du patient, et sont soutenues par des citations extraites de la littérature, considérant les bienfaits pour la santé, les risques et les effets secondaires des interventions. Les références qui soutiennent les recommandations ont été retenues selon le degré d'évidence en regard des critères utilisés par les lignes directrices antérieures de la Société canadienne d'ophtalmologie et d'autres organisations nationales.
      Canadian Ophthalmological Society Clinical Practice Guideline Expert Committee
      Canadian Ophthalmological Society evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the periodic eye examination in adults in Canada.
      Canadian Ophthalmological Society Cataract Surgery Clinical Practice Guideline Expert Committee
      Canadian Ophthalmological Society evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for cataract surgery in the adult eye.
      Canadian Ophthalmological Society Glaucoma Clinical Practice Guideline Expert Committee
      Canadian Ophthalmological Society evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the management of glaucoma in the adult eye.
      Canadian Diabetes Association Clinical Practice Guideline Expert Committee
      Canadian Diabetes Association clinical practice guidelines for the prevention and management of diabetes in Canada.
      Canadian Hypertension Education Program
      2008 CHEP Recommendations for the Management of Hypertension.
      Un résumé des Messages clés et des Recommandations se trouve en Annexe A.

      Définitions

      La RD fait référence aux changements rétiniens induits par le diabète. Elle se répartit en maladies non proliférante et proliférante, toutes deux pouvant s'associer à l'œdème maculaire diabétique (ŒMD).

      Épidémiologie

      En 2008, l'on avait estimé à 2,4 millions le nombre de Canadiens et Canadiennes atteints du diabète. La prévalence pourrait atteindre 3,7 millions en 2018/19. La RD demeure la principale cause de cécité juridique et fonctionnelle chez les personnes de 25 à 75 ans. L'incidence et la prévalence de la RD augmenteront au rythme de l'incidence et de la prévalence du diabète; cela comporte d'importantes implications pour les ressources humaines en matière de soins de santé. La RD est associée directement à l'âge, à la durée du diabète, à un A1C élevé, à l'hypertension, à l'ethnicité autre que blanche et à l'utilisation de l'insuline. Qui plus est, la population autochtones du Canada est affectée de façon disproportionnée par le diabète et la RD; ainsi, il faut mettre au point des stratégies pour offrir des programmes culturellement adéquats pour prévenir, dépister et traiter le diabète et la RD chez ces populations.
      • Naqshbandi M.
      • Harris S.B.
      • Esler J.G.
      • Antwi-Nsiah F.
      Global complication rates of type 2 diabetes in Indigenous peoples: A comprehensive review.
      • Macaulay A.C.
      • Montour L.T.
      • Adelson N.
      Prevalence of diabetic and atherosclerotic complications among Mohawk Indians of Kahnawake, PQ.

      Dépistage

      Le dépistage joue un rôle important dans la détection et l'intervention rapides visant à prévenir la progression de la RD. Hélas, la conformité aux recommandations est faible dans la population canadienne.
      • Sloan F.A.
      • Brown D.S.
      • Carlisle E.S.
      • Picone G.A.
      • Lee P.P.
      Monitoring visual status: why patients do or do not comply with practice guidelines.
      • Boucher M.C.
      • Desroches G.
      • Garcia-Salinas R.
      • et al.
      Teleophthalmology screening for diabetic retinopathy through mobile imaging units within Canada.
      • Rudnisky C.J.
      • Tennant M.T.S.
      • Johnson J.A.
      • Balko S.U.
      Diabetes and eye disease in Alberta.
      Il est à espérer que l'amélioration de l'infrastructure, une meilleure coordination et plus de coopération entre une vaste gamme de professions et d'organisations aideront à assurer une plus grande disponibilité de services de qualité aux personnes atteintes de diabète.
      Pourvu que l'on maintienne une sensibilité et une spécificité adéquates, l'examen clinique pour détecter la présence et la sévérité de la RD pourra être maintenu par l'examen de la rétine avec dilatation, grâce à l'ophtalmoscopie à la lampe à fente ou à la photographie rétinienne. L'utilisation des nouvelles technologies comme les caméras digitales et la téléophtalmologie peuvent améliorer l'accès au dépistage.
      Pour les personnes atteintes de la RD avec un diabète de type 1 dépisté après la puberté, le dépistage devrait commencer 5 ans après le diagnostic du diabète.
      • Klein R.
      • Klein B.
      • Moss S.
      • Davis M.D.
      • DeMets D.L.
      The Wisconsin epidemiologic study of diabetic retinopathy II. Prevalence and risk of diabetic retinopathy when age at diagnosis is less than 30 years.
      • Raman V.
      • Campbell F.
      • Holland P.
      • et al.
      Retinopathy screening in children and adolescents with diabetes.
      • Goldstein D.E.
      • Blinder K.J.
      • Ide C.H.
      • et al.
      Glycemic control and development of retinopathy in youth-onset insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus Results of a 12-year longitudinal study.
      Pour les personnes prépubères ayant un diagnostic de diabète de type 1, le dépistage de la RD ans devrait se faire à la puberté, à moins que d'autres considérations en suggèrent le besoins préalablement. Chez les personnes atteintes de la RD avec un diabète de type 2, le dépistage devrait commencer au moment du diagnostic du diabète.
      • Klein R.
      • Klein B.
      • Moss S.
      • Davis M.D.
      • DeMets D.L.
      The Wisconsin epidemiologic study of diabetic retinopathy III. Prevalence and risk of diabetic retinopathy when age at diagnosis is 30 or more years.
      • Klein R.
      • Klein B.E.
      • Moss S.E.
      • et al.
      The Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of diabetic retinopathy X. Four-year incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy when age at diagnosis is 30 years or more.
      Les évaluations subséquentes de la progression de la RD dépendront du niveau de rétinopathie. Pour les personnes qui ne présentent pas de signes de rétinopathie, l'évaluation devrait se faire à tous les ans chez ceux et celles qui ont un diabète de type 1
      • Mohamed Q.
      • Gillies M.C.
      • Wong T.Y.
      Management of diabetic retinopathy: a systematic review.
      et à intervalles de 1 à 2 ans chez ceux et celles qui ont un diabète de type 2,
      • Misra A.
      • Bachmann M.O.
      • Greenwood R.H.
      • et al.
      Trends in yield and effects of screening intervals during 17 years of a large UK community-based diabetic retinopathy screening programme.
      • Mitchell P.
      The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy: a study of 1300 diabetics from Newcastle and the Hunter Valley.
      selon le respect anticipé. Il faut assurer des soins de suivi opportuns et appropriés après avoir détecté une RD.

      Télésanté et téléophtalmologie

      La géographie et la démographie du Canada conviennent particulièrement bien aux attributs de la téléophtalmologie. La RD et l'ŒMD peuvent être décelés avec un haut niveau de sensibilité et de spécificité à l'aide des plateformes de téléophtalmologie bien mises au point. Il faut cependant maintenir les normes appropriées pour tous les aspects du programme de téléophtalmologie, y compris l'obtention, la lecture et l'évaluation de l'image, la programmation des clients ainsi que la gestion et le stockage de leurs informations et des données d'imageries.
      • Tennant M.T.
      • Greve M.D.
      • Rudnisky C.J.
      • Hillson T.R.
      • Hinz B.J.
      Identification of diabetic retinopathy by stereoscopic digital imaging via teleophthalmology: a comparison to slide film.
      • Boucher M.C.
      • Gresset J.A.
      • Angioi K.
      • Olivier S.
      Effectiveness and safety of screening for diabetic retinopathy with two nonmydriatic digital images compared with the seven standard stereoscopic photographic fields.
      • Rudnisky C.J.
      • Tennant M.T.
      • Weis E.
      • Ting A.
      • Hinz B.J.
      • Greve M.D.
      Web-based grading of compressed stereoscopic digital photography versus standard slide film photography for the diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy.

      Facteurs de risque et prévention de la progression de la rétinopathie diabétique

      Les patients diabétiques bénéficient des soins d'une équipe multidisciplinaire. Alors que la gestion du diabète incombe d'abord au médecin de famille du patient et/ou à l'endocrinologue, l'ophtalmologiste doit discuter avec le patient de l'importance d'atteindre les valeurs cibles et s'enquérir du contrôle glycémique et du contrôle de la tension arterielle à des intervalles réguliers.

      Modalités de traitement

      Le traitement des patients qui se présentent avec une RD comprend traditionnellement le laser (focal, en grille maculaire et panrétinien), qui s'est avéré efficace pour certains choix de patients du Diabetic Retinopathy Study (DRS) et de Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS). Plus récemment, les stéroïdes intraoculaires et les inhibiteurs des facteurs de croissance endothéliale vasculaire (FCEV) ont été utilisés seuls ou en complément au laser. Maintenant, des données probantes de haut niveau indiquent que l'utilisation d'inhibiteurs des FCEV en conjonction avec le laser focalisé pour le traitement de l'ŒMD est supérieure à l'emploi du laser seul.
      • Nguyen Q.D.
      • Shah S.M.
      • Khwaja A.A.
      • et al.
      READ-2 Study Group
      Two-year outcomes of the ranibizumab for edema of the macula in diabetes (READ-2) study.
      • Mitchell P.
      • Bandello F.
      • Schmidt-Erfurth U.
      • et al.
      RESTORE study group
      The RESTORE study: ranibizumab monotherapy or combined with laser versus laser monotherapy for diabetic macular edema.
      • Michaelides M.
      • Kaines A.
      • Hamilton R.D.
      • Fraser-Bell S.
      • et al.
      A prospective randomized trial of intravitreal bevacizumab or laser therapy in the management of diabetic macular edema (BOLT study) 12-month data: report 2.
      La vitrectomie s'est avérée supérieure à l'observation pour certaines formes persistantes d'hémorragie du vitré
      Diabetic Retinopathy Vitrectomy Study Research Group
      Early vitrectomy for severe vitreous hemorrhage in diabetic retinopathy. Two-year results of a randomized trial. Diabetic Retinopathy Vitrectomy Study report 2.
      et demeure la seule façon d'enlever la prolifération fibreuse et de remédier aux décollements tractionnels, bien que les résultats visuels de cette chirurgie soient variables. L'utilité de la vitrectomie pour traiter l'ŒMD demeure controversée, bien qu'elle puisse être particulièrement avantageuse pour les yeux ayant une traction vitréomaculaire.
      • Haller J.A.
      • Qin H.
      • Apte R.S.
      • et al.
      Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network Writing Committee
      Vitrectomy outcomes in eyes with diabetic macular edema and vitreomacular traction.
      • Flaxel C.J.
      • Edwards A.R.
      • Aiello L.P.
      • et al.
      Factors associated with visual acuity outcomes after vitrectomy for diabetic macular edema: diabetic retinopathy clinical research network.

      Grossesse

      Il n'y a pas suffisamment de données probantes disponibles pour établir la sécurité des inhibiteurs des FCEV intraoculaires pendant la grossesse. Ainsi, il faudra être vigilant si on souhaite les utiliser lorsqu'une femme est enceinte ou pourrait le devenir. Il faut s'interroger sur la possibilité de grossesse de la femme en âge gestationnel lors de l'évaluation pré-traitement. L'on devrait conseiller aux patientes ayant un diabète de type 1 ou 2 qui songent à la grossesse de subir un examen ophtalmique par un spécialiste des soins oculaires avant de chercher à devenir enceinte. Il faudrait répéter les évaluations pendant le premier trimestre, puis selon l'état de la rétinopathie et le taux de progression durant la grossesse, puis dans la première année postpartum.
      Diabetes Control and Complications Trial Research Group
      Effect of pregnancy on microvascular complications in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial.
      Diabetes Control and Complication Trial Research Group
      Early worsening of diabetic retinopathy in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial.

      Néovascularisation de l'iris

      Chez les patients qui ont une RD et une néovascularisation de l'iris ou un glaucome néovasculaire, il faudrait considérer l'injection d'un inhibiteur de FCEV en conjonction avec la photocoagulation panrétinienne pour produire une régression de la néovascularisation et réduire le risque de glaucome à long terme.
      • Sugimoto Y.
      • Mochizuki H.
      • Okumichi H.
      • Takumida M.
      • Takamatsu M.
      • Kawamata S.
      • Kiuchi Y.
      Effect of intravitreal bevacizumab on iris vessels in neovascular glaucoma patients.
      • Falavarjani K.G.
      • Modarres M.
      • Nazari H.
      Therapeutic effect of bevacizumab injected into the silicone oil in eyes with neovascular glaucoma after vitrectomy for advanced diabetic retinopathy.
      • Beutel J.
      • Peters S.
      • Lüke M.
      • Aisenbrey S.
      • Szurman P.
      • Spitzer M.S.
      • et al.
      Bevacizumab Study Group
      Bevacizumab as adjuvant for neovascular glaucoma.
      • Lupinacci A.P.
      • Calzada J.I.
      • Rafieetery M.
      • Charles S.
      • Netland P.A.
      Clinical outcomes of patients with anterior segment neovascularization treated with or without intraocular bevacizumab.

      Considérations économiques

      Une pleine discussion du coût de la RD et de la rentabilité du dépistage et de la gestion va au-delà de la portée des lignes directrices. Toutefois, les données disponibles suggèrent qu'il y a un important avantage économique associé au dépistage et au traitement de la RD. Le diabète a atteint des proportions épidémiques chez certaines populations canadiennes et on peut s'attendre à une croissance éventuelle des coûts associés à la RD.
      • Maberley D.
      • Walker H.
      • Koushik A.
      • Cruess A.
      Screening for diabetic retinopathy in James Bay, Ontario: a cost-effectiveness analysis.
      • Polak B.C.
      • Crijns H.
      • Casparie A.F.
      • Niessen L.W.
      Cost-effectiveness of glycemic control and ophthalmological care in diabetic retinopathy.

      Déclarations des auteurs

      Les membres du Comité d'experts du Guide de pratique clinique de la SCO pour la rétinopathie diabétique ont participé bénévolement et n'ont reçu aucune rémunération ni aucun honoraire pour le temps et le travail qu'ils y ont consacrés. Les membres du comité ont fait des déclarations concernant leurs relations avec les compagnies pharmaceutiques ou d'appareils médicaux au cours des 24 derniers mois. Voir (http://www.canadianjournalofophthalmology.ca/).

      Soutien

      Le financement du présent guide a été fourni par la Société canadienne d'ophtalmologie et par les commanditaires suivants (par ordre alphabétique), sous forme de subvention non restreinte à la formation : Alcon Canada Inc, Allergan Canada Inc, AMO, Novartis Canada Inc., Pfizer Canada Inc. Aucune industrie ni aucun gouvernement n'a participé à la décision de publier ce guide ni au choix des sujets traités ni à tout autre aspect de l'élaboration du document.

      Annexe A. Résumé des messages clés et des recommandations

      Épidémiologie du diabète

      Messages clés

      • On prévoit que l’incidence et la prévalence du diabète augmenteront progressivement au Canada en raison des tendances démographiques, dont le vieillissement de la population et les taux élevés d’obésité.
      • Compte tenu de la prévalence croissante du diabète, on prévoit également une prévalence croissante de la rétinopathie diabétique (RD), ce qui aura d’importantes répercussions sur les coûts et les ressources humaines en santé et, par conséquent, des répercussions sur les politiques.
      • Les populations autochtones du Canada sont touchées démesurément par le diabète et la RD. Il faudra mettre au point des stratégies pour offrir des programmes culturellement adaptés de prévention, de dépistage et de traitement du diabète et de la RD chez ces populations, qui habitent souvent des régions éloignées et mal desservies.

      Épidémiologie de la rétinopathie diabétique

      Messages clés

      • La RD demeure la principale cause de cécité dite « légale » et fonctionnelle pendant la vie active (de 25 à 75 ans), partout dans le monde. L’incidence globale continue d’augmenter en raison de l’épidémie de nouveaux cas de diabète diagnostiqués.
      • On a constaté des taux de RD non proliférante (RDNP) et proliférante (RDP) plus élevés chez les populations autochtones du Canada que chez celles d’autres pays du monde, cette rétinopathie se classant au deuxième rang parmi les causes de perte de vision, après la cataracte.

      Dépistage

      Messages clés

      • L’observation par la population canadienne des recommandations de dépistage demeure faible.
      • L’amélioration de l’infrastructure du système de santé et une meilleure coordination et coopération entre une grande variété de professions et d’organisations aidera à assurer la disponibilité de services de qualité pour les personnes atteintes de diabète.
      • À condition de maintenir une sensibilité et une spécificité adéquates, l’examen clinique d’évaluation de la présence et de la sévérité de la RD peut être effectué par examen de la rétine avec dilatation, grâce à l’ophtalmoscopie à la lampe à fente ou à la photographie rétinienne.
      • L’utilisation des nouvelles technologies comme les caméras numériques et la téléophtalmologie peuvent améliorer l’accès au dépistage.
      • Il y a peu de raisons d’utiliser la tomographie à cohérence optique de routine pour les yeux des personnes diabétiques sans rétinopathie ou pour les yeux qui ont une RD légère à modérée (avec vision meilleure que 20/30), lorsque l’examen clinique ne détecte pas de signes d’œdème maculaire.
      • Après le dépistage, il faut assurer des soins de suivi opportuns et appropriés, avec assurance-qualité.

      Recommandations

      • Pour les personnes atteintes de diabète de type 1 diagnostiqué après la puberté, le dépistage de la RD devrait commencer 5 ans après le diagnostic de diabète [Niveau 1
        • Klein R.
        • Klein B.
        • Moss S.
        • Davis M.D.
        • DeMets D.L.
        The Wisconsin epidemiologic study of diabetic retinopathy II. Prevalence and risk of diabetic retinopathy when age at diagnosis is less than 30 years.
        • Raman V.
        • Campbell F.
        • Holland P.
        • et al.
        Retinopathy screening in children and adolescents with diabetes.
        • Goldstein D.E.
        • Blinder K.J.
        • Ide C.H.
        • et al.
        Glycemic control and development of retinopathy in youth-onset insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus Results of a 12-year longitudinal study.
        ]. Pour les personnes chez qui le diabète de type 1 est diagnostiqué avant la puberté, le dépistage de la RD devrait commencer à la puberté, à moins que d’autres facteurs en suggèrent la nécessité plus tôt [Consensus].
      • Chez les personnes atteintes de diabète de type 2, le dépistage de la RD devrait commencer au moment du diagnostic du diabète [Niveau 1
        • Klein R.
        • Klein B.
        • Moss S.
        • Davis M.D.
        • DeMets D.L.
        The Wisconsin epidemiologic study of diabetic retinopathy III. Prevalence and risk of diabetic retinopathy when age at diagnosis is 30 or more years.
        • Klein R.
        • Klein B.E.
        • Moss S.E.
        • et al.
        The Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of diabetic retinopathy X. Four-year incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy when age at diagnosis is 30 years or more.
        ].
      • Les dépistages subséquents de la RD dépendront du degré de rétinopathie. Chez les personnes qui ne présentent pas de signes de rétinopathie, le dépistage devrait se faire à tous les ans chez ceux et celles qui ont un diabète de type 1 [Niveau 2
        • Mohamed Q.
        • Gillies M.C.
        • Wong T.Y.
        Management of diabetic retinopathy: a systematic review.
        ] et à intervalles de 1 à 2 ans chez ceux et celles qui ont un diabète de type 2 [Niveau 2
        • Misra A.
        • Bachmann M.O.
        • Greenwood R.H.
        • et al.
        Trends in yield and effects of screening intervals during 17 years of a large UK community-based diabetic retinopathy screening programme.
        • Mitchell P.
        The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy: a study of 1300 diabetics from Newcastle and the Hunter Valley.
        ], selon l’observation anticipée.
      • Lorsque la RDNP est détectée, l’examen devrait être effectué au moins à tous les ans pour une RDNP légère ou plus fréquemment (à intervalles de 3 à 6 mois) pour une RDNP modérée ou sévère, selon le degré de sévérité de la RD [Niveau 2
        • Younis N.
        • Broadbent D.M.
        • Vora J.P.
        • Harding S.P.
        Liverpool Diabetic Eye Study Incidence of sight-threatening retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes in the Liverpool Diabetic Eye Study: a cohort study.
        • Klein R.
        • Klein B.E.
        • Moss S.E.
        • Cruickshanks K.J.
        The Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy: XVII The 14-year incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy and associated risk factors in type 1 diabetes.
        ].

      Télésanté et téléophtalmologie

      Messages clés

      • La RD et l’œdème maculaire diabétique (ŒMD) peuvent être détectés avec un haut degré de sensibilité et de spécificité à l’aide de plateformes de téléophtalmologie bien conçues.
      • Les programmes de téléophtalmologie doivent être conçus de façon à répondre aux besoins particuliers de la région en cause et de la population ciblée.
      • Il faut maintenir des normes appropriées pour tous les aspects d’un programme de téléophtalmologie, y compris l’obtention, la lecture et l’évaluation des images, l’assurance-qualité, l’organisation des rendez-vous et la gestion des patients et de leurs renseignements, ainsi que les données d’images et leur stockage.
      • La géographie et la démographie du Canada conviennent particulièrement aux attributs de la téléophtalmologie.

      Recommandation

      • Étant donné leur efficacité bien démontrée, il faudrait implanter des programmes de téléophtalmologie bien conçus afin d’améliorer l’accès et la conformité au suivi chez les personnes atteintes de diabète au sein des populations isolées culturellement, économiquement ou géographiquement [Niveau 1
        • Tennant M.T.
        • Greve M.D.
        • Rudnisky C.J.
        • Hillson T.R.
        • Hinz B.J.
        Identification of diabetic retinopathy by stereoscopic digital imaging via teleophthalmology: a comparison to slide film.
        • Boucher M.C.
        • Gresset J.A.
        • Angioi K.
        • Olivier S.
        Effectiveness and safety of screening for diabetic retinopathy with two nonmydriatic digital images compared with the seven standard stereoscopic photographic fields.
        • Rudnisky C.J.
        • Tennant M.T.
        • Weis E.
        • Ting A.
        • Hinz B.J.
        • Greve M.D.
        Web-based grading of compressed stereoscopic digital photography versus standard slide film photography for the diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy.
        ].

      Facteurs de risque de rétinopathie diabétique et prévention de sa progression

      Messages clés

      • Les patients diabétiques bénéficient des soins d’une équipe multidisciplinaire. Même si la gestion du diabète incombe d’abord au médecin de famille du patient et(ou) à son endocrinologue, l’ophtalmologiste doit discuter avec le patient de l’importance d’atteindre les valeurs cibles et s’enquérir à intervalles réguliers de leur contrôle.
      • Les patients atteints de diabète qui prennent des agents antiplaquettaires n’ont pas besoin de modifier leur médication après le développement d’une rétinopathie diabétique.
      • Compte tenu du manque de données probantes à l’appui des avantages d’un supplément de vitamines antioxydantes dépassant l’apport quotidien recommandé chez les patients diabétiques, les médecins devraient éviter de recommander ces vitamines à leurs patients.

      Recommandations

      • Afin de prévenir le début de la RD et d’en retarder la progression, les personnes diabétiques devraient être traitées de façon à atteindre un contrôle glycémique optimal (i.e. A1C ≤ 7,0 %) [Niveau 1
        Diabetes Control and Complications Trial Research Group
        The effect of intensive treatment of diabetes on the development and progression of long-term complications in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.
        UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) Group
        Intensive blood-glucose control with sulphonylureas or insulin compared with conventional treatment and risk of complications in patients with type 2 diabetes (UKPDS 33).
        ].
      • Vu la relation continue entre l’A1C et les complications microvasculaires sans seuil apparent d’avantages, il faudrait expliquer aux patients que toute réduction de l’A1C, aussi petite soit-elle, produira des avantages proportionnels [Niveau 1
        Diabetes Control and Complications Trial Research Group
        The effect of intensive treatment of diabetes on the development and progression of long-term complications in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.
        UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) Group
        Intensive blood-glucose control with sulphonylureas or insulin compared with conventional treatment and risk of complications in patients with type 2 diabetes (UKPDS 33).
        ]. Chez les patients atteints de diabète de type 2, les avantages marginaux de l’obtention d’un A1C ≤ 6,5 % doivent être pesés en regard des risques d’hypoglycémie ou de mortalité cardiovasculaire accrue chez les patients à risque élevé de maladie cardiovasculaire [Niveau 1
        • Chew E.Y.
        • Ambrosius W.T.
        • Davis M.D.
        • et al.
        ACCORD Study Group; ACCORD Eye Study Group
        Effects of medical therapies on retinopathy progression in type 2 diabetes.
        ADVANCE Collaborative Group
        ADVANCE – Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: patient recruitment and characteristics of the study population at baseline.
        • Duckworth W.
        • Abraira C.
        • Moritz T.
        • et al.
        VADT Investigators
        Glucose control and vascular complications in veterans with type 2 diabetes.
        ].
      • Afin de réduire le risque de développement de la RD ou d’en retarder la progression, les personnes diabétiques devraient être traitées de façon à obtenir un contrôle optimal de la tension artérielle (p. ex., < 130/80 mm Hg) [Niveau 1
        • Klein R.
        • Klein B.E.
        • Moss S.E.
        • Cruickshanks K.J.
        The Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy: XVII The 14-year incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy and associated risk factors in type 1 diabetes.
        • Klein R.
        • Moss S.E.
        • Klein B.E.
        • Davis M.D.
        • DeMets D.L.
        The Wisconsin epidemiologic study of diabetic retinopathy XI. The incidence of macular edema.
        pour le diabète de type 1; Niveau 2
        UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) Group
        Intensive blood-glucose control with sulphonylureas or insulin compared with conventional treatment and risk of complications in patients with type 2 diabetes (UKPDS 33).
        • Chew E.Y.
        • Ambrosius W.T.
        • Davis M.D.
        • et al.
        ACCORD Study Group; ACCORD Eye Study Group
        Effects of medical therapies on retinopathy progression in type 2 diabetes.
        ADVANCE Collaborative Group
        ADVANCE – Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: patient recruitment and characteristics of the study population at baseline.
        pour le diabète de type 2].

      Modalités de traitement

      Traitement de l’œdème maculaire

      Messages clés

      • De plus en plus de preuves démontrent que les injections intraoculaires d’inhibiteurs du facteur de croissance vasculaire endothélial (FCVE) constituent un traitement efficace de l’ŒMD et produisent une amélioration supérieure de la vision que le laser focal ou à grille maculaire seuls.
      • L’injection intraoculaire d’un stéroïde produit une résorption rapide de l’ŒMD; l’amélioration n’est cependant pas soutenue et elle est associée à une hausse significative de l’incidence de pression intraoculaire accrue et de cataracte. Pour les patients pseudophaques, l’amélioration de l’acuité visuelle peut approcher celle des thérapies anti-FCVE.

      Recommandations

      • Les yeux qui présentent un œdème maculaire cliniquement significatif selon les critères ETDRS sans épaississement maculaire central devraient recevoir un traitement au laser focal [Niveau 1
        Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study Research Group
        Photocoagulation for diabetic macular edema Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study Report Number 1.
        ]; on devrait toutefois envisager un traitement par inhibiteur du FCVE seul ou en combinaison avec un laser focal pour les yeux qui présentent un épaississement maculaire central [Niveau 1
        • Nguyen Q.D.
        • Shah S.M.
        • Khwaja A.A.
        • et al.
        READ-2 Study Group
        Two-year outcomes of the ranibizumab for edema of the macula in diabetes (READ-2) study.
        • Mitchell P.
        • Bandello F.
        • Schmidt-Erfurth U.
        • et al.
        RESTORE study group
        The RESTORE study: ranibizumab monotherapy or combined with laser versus laser monotherapy for diabetic macular edema.
        pour le ranibizumab; Niveau 2
        • Michaelides M.
        • Kaines A.
        • Hamilton R.D.
        • Fraser-Bell S.
        • et al.
        A prospective randomized trial of intravitreal bevacizumab or laser therapy in the management of diabetic macular edema (BOLT study) 12-month data: report 2.
        pour le bévacizumab].
      • Une vitrectomie devrait être envisagée pour les yeux qui présentent des signes de traction vitréomaculaire et d’œdème maculaire [Niveau 1
        • Haller J.A.
        • Qin H.
        • Apte R.S.
        • et al.
        Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network Writing Committee
        Vitrectomy outcomes in eyes with diabetic macular edema and vitreomacular traction.
        • Flaxel C.J.
        • Edwards A.R.
        • Aiello L.P.
        • et al.
        Factors associated with visual acuity outcomes after vitrectomy for diabetic macular edema: diabetic retinopathy clinical research network.
        ].

      Traitement de la rétinopathie proliférante

      Messages clés

      • Les patients devraient être avisés que la perte de champ de vision peut survenir après une photocoagulation panrétinienne (PPR), mais que la plupart peuvent maintenir suffisamment de champ visuel pour la conduite automobile après une PPR.
      • L’œdème maculaire peut se développer après une PPR, mais il se résout dans la majorité des yeux dans les 6 mois.
      • L’ajout à la PPR de l’injection d’un inhibiteur du FCVE accroît les taux de régression à court terme des néovaisseaux.

      Recommandations

      • Dans les yeux qui présentent des caractéristiques de risque élevé selon les critères de la Diabetic Retinopathy Study (DRS), la PPR devait être effectuée pour réduire le risque de perte de vision sévère [Niveau 1
        Diabetic Retinopathy Study Research Group
        Photocoagulation treatment of proliferative diabetic retinopathy Clinical applications of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (DRS) findings, DRS Report Number 8.
        ].
      • Dans les yeux atteints de rétinopathie proliférante et d’œdème maculaire central, une injection intraoculaire d’inhibiteur du FCVE devrait être envisagée au moment de la PPR pour améliorer le résultat visuel à court terme [Niveau 1
        • Googe J.
        • Brucker A.J.
        • Bressler N.M.
        • Qin H.
        • Aiello L.P.
        • Antoszyk A.
        • et al.
        Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network
        Randomized trial evaluating short-term effects of intravitreal ranibizumab or triamcinolone acetonide on macular edema after focal/grid laser for diabetic macular edema in eyes also receiving panretinal photocoagulation.
        pour le ranibizumab; Niveau 2
        • Cho W.B.
        • Oh S.B.
        • Moon J.W.
        • Kim H.C.
        Panretinal photocoagulation combined with intravitreal bevacizumab in high-risk proliferative diabetic retinopathy.
        pour le bévacizumab].
      • Il faudrait envisager la vitrectomie pour les yeux qui présentent une hémorragie persistante du vitré [Niveau 1
        Diabetic Retinopathy Vitrectomy Study Research Group
        Early vitrectomy for severe vitreous hemorrhage in diabetic retinopathy Four-year results of a randomized trial: Diabetic Retinopathy Vitrectomy Study Report 5.
        ], une hétérotopie maculaire [Niveau 3
        • Sato Y.
        • Shimada H.
        • Aso S.
        • Matsui M.
        Vitrectomy for diabetic macular heterotopia.
        ] ou un décollement tractionnel de la macula [Niveau 3
        • Flynn Jr, H.W.
        • Chew E.Y.
        • Simons B.D.
        • Barton F.B.
        • Remaley N.A.
        • Ferris 3rd, F.L.
        Pars plana vitrectomy in the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study ETDRS report number 17. The Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study Research Group.
        • Thompson J.T.
        • de Bustros S.
        • Michels R.G.
        • Rice T.A.
        Results and prognostic factors in vitrectomy for diabetic traction retinal detachment of the macula.
        ], un décollement rhegmatogène [Niveau 3
        • Thompson J.T.
        • de Bustros S.
        • Michels R.G.
        • Rice T.A.
        Results and prognostic factors in vitrectomy for diabetic traction – rhegmatogenous retinal detachment.
        • Yang C.M.
        • Su P.Y.
        • Yeh P.T.
        • Chen M.S.
        Combined rhegmatogenous and traction retinal detachment in proliferative diabetic retinopathy: clinical manifestations and surgical outcome.
        ], ou une hémorragie prémaculaire dense [Niveau 3
        • O'Hanley G.P.
        • Canny C.L.
        Diabetic dense premacular hemorrhage A possible indication for prompt vitrectomy.
        • Ramsay R.C.
        • Knobloch W.H.
        • Cantrill H.L.
        Timing of vitrectomy for active proliferative diabetic retinopathy.
        ].
      • Dans les yeux qui subissent une vitrectomie pour RDP active, les inhibiteurs du FCVE devraient être envisagés avant l’opération pour réduire l’hémorragie et les complications associées à la vitrectomie [Niveau 2
        • Ahmadieh H.
        • Shoeibi N.
        • Entezari M.
        • Monshizadeh R.
        Intravitreal bevacizumab for prevention of early postvitrectomy hemorrhage in diabetic patients: a randomized clinical trial.
        • di Lauro R.
        • De Ruggiero P.
        • di Lauro R.
        • di Lauro M.T.
        • Romano M.R.
        Intravitreal bevacizumab for surgical treatment of severe proliferative diabetic retinopathy.
        • Modarres M.
        • Nazari H.
        • Falavarjani K.G.
        • Naseripour M.
        • Hashemi M.
        • Parvaresh M.M.
        Intravitreal injection of bevacizumab before vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy.
        • Rizzo S.
        • Genovesi-Ebert F.
        • Di Bartolo E.
        • Vento A.
        • Miniaci S.
        • Williams G.
        Injection of intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin) as a preoperative adjunct before vitrectomy surgery in the treatment of severe proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR).
        pour le bévacizumab].

      Grossesse

      Message clé

      • Il n’existe pas suffisamment de données probantes disponibles pour établir la sécurité des inhibiteurs du FCVE intraoculaires pendant la grossesse. Ainsi, il faudra être vigilant si on les utilise chez une femme enceinte ou qui pourrait le devenir. Au cours de l’évaluation prétraitement, il faut interroger expressément les femmes en âge de procréer d’âge au sujet de la possibilité de grossesse.

      Recommandation

      • Il faudrait conseiller aux patientes atteintes de diabète de type 1 ou 2 qui songent à la grossesse de subir une évaluation ophtalmique par un spécialiste des soins oculaires avant de chercher à concevoir. Il faudrait répéter les évaluations pendant le premier trimestre, et par la suite en fonction du stade de la rétinopathie et du taux de progression durant le reste de la grossesse puis au cours de la première année postpartum [Niveau 1
        Diabetes Control and Complications Trial Research Group
        Effect of pregnancy on microvascular complications in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial.
        Diabetes Control and Complication Trial Research Group
        Early worsening of diabetic retinopathy in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial.
        pour le diabète de type 1 et Consensus pour le diabète de type 2].

      Néovascularisation de l'iris

      Message clé

      • Chez les patients atteints de RD et de néovascularisation de l’iris ou de glaucome néovasculaire, il faudrait envisager l’injection d’un inhibiteur du FCVE en combinaison avec la PPR pour produire une régression de la néovascularisation et réduire le risque de glaucome à long terme.

      Considérations économiques

      Message clé

      • Les données probantes disponibles suggèrent que le dépistage et le traitement précoce de la RD comportent d’importants avantages économiques.

      Disclosures

      Members of the COS Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Practice Guideline Expert Committee were volunteers and received no remuneration or honoraria for their time or work. Committee members' disclosures regarding their relationships to pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturers in the past 24 months are available in the full guideline document available at http://www.canadianjournalofophthalmology.ca/.

      Appendix A. Summary of Key Messages and Recommendations

      Epidemiology of Diabetes

      Key Messages

      • The incidence and prevalence of diabetes in Canada are projected to increase steadily due to demographic trends, including an aging population and high rates of obesity.
      • The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is projected to increase as the prevalence of diabetes increases. This has important implications for healthcare human resources and costs, and hence policy implications.
      • Aboriginal populations in Canada are disproportionately affected by diabetes and DR. Strategies are needed to provide culturally appropriate programs to prevent, screen and treat diabetes and DR in these populations, who often reside in remote and underserviced areas.

      Epidemiology of Diabetic Retinopathy

      Key Messages

      • DR remains the leading cause of legal and functional blindness for persons in their working years (ages 25-75) worldwide. The overall incidence continues to increase given the epidemic of new-onset diabetes.
      • The rates of both nonproliferative DR (NPDR) and proliferative DR (PDR) have been found to be higher in the Canadian Aboriginal population, compared with indigenous populations around the world, and are second only to cataract as a cause of visual loss.

      Screening

      Key Messages

      • Compliance with recommended screening is low in the Canadian population.
      • Improvement of the healthcare system infrastructure and better coordination and cooperation across a wide range of professions and organizations will help to ensure better availability of quality services to people with diabetes.
      • Provided adequate sensitivity and specificity are maintained, clinical examination to detect the presence and severity of DR may be achieved by dilated retinal examination by slit lamp ophthalmoscopy, or by retinal photography.
      • The use of new technologies such as digital cameras and teleophthalmology can improve access to screening.
      • There is little reason to routinely obtain optical coherence tomography in eyes of people with diabetes and no retinopathy, or in eyes with mild to moderate DR (with vision better than 20/30) when clinical examination fails to show evidence of macular edema.
      • Timely and appropriate follow-up care with quality assurance needs to be ensured after screening.

      Recommendations

      • For individuals with type 1 diabetes diagnosed after puberty, screening for DR should be initiated 5 years after the diagnosis of diabetes [Level 1
        • Klein R.
        • Klein B.
        • Moss S.
        • Davis M.D.
        • DeMets D.L.
        The Wisconsin epidemiologic study of diabetic retinopathy II. Prevalence and risk of diabetic retinopathy when age at diagnosis is less than 30 years.
        • Raman V.
        • Campbell F.
        • Holland P.
        • et al.
        Retinopathy screening in children and adolescents with diabetes.
        • Goldstein D.E.
        • Blinder K.J.
        • Ide C.H.
        • et al.
        Glycemic control and development of retinopathy in youth-onset insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus Results of a 12-year longitudinal study.
        ]. For individuals diagnosed with type 1 diabetes before puberty, screening for DR should be initiated at puberty, unless there are other considerations that would suggest the need for an earlier exam [Consensus].
      • Screening for DR in individuals with type 2 diabetes should be initiated at the time of diagnosis of diabetes [Level 1
        • Klein R.
        • Klein B.
        • Moss S.
        • Davis M.D.
        • DeMets D.L.
        The Wisconsin epidemiologic study of diabetic retinopathy III. Prevalence and risk of diabetic retinopathy when age at diagnosis is 30 or more years.
        • Klein R.
        • Klein B.E.
        • Moss S.E.
        • et al.
        The Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of diabetic retinopathy X. Four-year incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy when age at diagnosis is 30 years or more.
        ].
      • Subsequent screening for DR in individuals depends on the level of retinopathy. In those who do not show evidence of retinopathy, screening should occur every year in those with type 1 diabetes [Level 2
        • Mohamed Q.
        • Gillies M.C.
        • Wong T.Y.
        Management of diabetic retinopathy: a systematic review.
        ] and every 1-2 years in those with type 2 diabetes [Level 2
        • Misra A.
        • Bachmann M.O.
        • Greenwood R.H.
        • et al.
        Trends in yield and effects of screening intervals during 17 years of a large UK community-based diabetic retinopathy screening programme.
        • Mitchell P.
        The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy: a study of 1300 diabetics from Newcastle and the Hunter Valley.
        ] depending on anticipated compliance.
      • Once NPDR is detected, examination should be conducted at least annually for mild NPDR, or more frequently (at 3- to 6-month intervals) for moderate or severe NPDR based on the DR severity level [Level 2
        • Younis N.
        • Broadbent D.M.
        • Vora J.P.
        • Harding S.P.
        Liverpool Diabetic Eye Study Incidence of sight-threatening retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes in the Liverpool Diabetic Eye Study: a cohort study.
        • Klein R.
        • Klein B.E.
        • Moss S.E.
        • Cruickshanks K.J.
        The Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy: XVII The 14-year incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy and associated risk factors in type 1 diabetes.
        ].

      Telehealth And Teleophthalmology

      Key Messages

      • Both DR and diabetic macular edema (DME) can be detected with a high level of sensitivity and specificity using properly developed teleophthalmology platforms.
      • Teleophthalmology programs need to be constructed to match the needs of the particular jurisdiction and target population.
      • Appropriate standards need to be upheld for all aspects of a teleophthalmology program including image acquisition, image reading, evaluation, quality assurance, scheduling and management of patients and their information, and image data and storage.
      • The geography and demographics of Canada are particularly suited to the attributes of teleophthalmology.

      Recommendation

      • Given high-level evidence of effectiveness, properly designed teleophthalmology programs should be implemented to improve access to, and compliance with, monitoring in culturally, economically or geographically isolated populations of individuals with diabetes [Level 1
        • Tennant M.T.
        • Greve M.D.
        • Rudnisky C.J.
        • Hillson T.R.
        • Hinz B.J.
        Identification of diabetic retinopathy by stereoscopic digital imaging via teleophthalmology: a comparison to slide film.
        • Boucher M.C.
        • Gresset J.A.
        • Angioi K.
        • Olivier S.
        Effectiveness and safety of screening for diabetic retinopathy with two nonmydriatic digital images compared with the seven standard stereoscopic photographic fields.
        • Rudnisky C.J.
        • Tennant M.T.
        • Weis E.
        • Ting A.
        • Hinz B.J.
        • Greve M.D.
        Web-based grading of compressed stereoscopic digital photography versus standard slide film photography for the diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy.
        ].

      Risk Factors For And Prevention of Progression Of Diabetic Retinopathy

      Key Messages

      • Patients with diabetes benefit from care provided by a multidisciplinary team. While diabetes management is primarily the responsibility of the patient's family doctor and/or endocrinologist, the ophthalmologist should discuss the importance of achieving target values with the patient and enquire about control at regular intervals.
      • Patients with diabetes who are taking antiplatelet agents do not need to alter their medication regimen following the development of diabetic retinopathy.
      • Given the lack of evidence to substantiate the benefit of antioxidant vitamin supplementation in excess of the recommended daily allowance in patients with diabetes, physicians should avoid recommending this to their patients.

      Recommendations

      • In order to prevent the onset and delay the progression of DR, individuals with diabetes should be treated to achieve optimal blood glucose control (i.e. A1C ≤ 7.0%) [Level 1
        Diabetes Control and Complications Trial Research Group
        The effect of intensive treatment of diabetes on the development and progression of long-term complications in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.
        UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) Group
        Intensive blood-glucose control with sulphonylureas or insulin compared with conventional treatment and risk of complications in patients with type 2 diabetes (UKPDS 33).
        ].
      • As there is a continuous relationship between A1C and microvascular complications with no apparent threshold of benefit, patients should be advised of the incremental benefits associated with incremental reductions in A1C [Level 1
        Diabetes Control and Complications Trial Research Group
        The effect of intensive treatment of diabetes on the development and progression of long-term complications in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.
        UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) Group
        Intensive blood-glucose control with sulphonylureas or insulin compared with conventional treatment and risk of complications in patients with type 2 diabetes (UKPDS 33).
        ]. In patients with type 2 diabetes, the incremental benefits of achieving an A1C ≤ 6.5% must be balanced against the risks of hypoglycemia or increased cardiovascular mortality in patients at elevated risk of cardiovascular disease [Level 1
        • Chew E.Y.
        • Ambrosius W.T.
        • Davis M.D.
        • et al.
        ACCORD Study Group; ACCORD Eye Study Group
        Effects of medical therapies on retinopathy progression in type 2 diabetes.
        ADVANCE Collaborative Group
        ADVANCE – Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: patient recruitment and characteristics of the study population at baseline.
        • Duckworth W.
        • Abraira C.
        • Moritz T.
        • et al.
        VADT Investigators
        Glucose control and vascular complications in veterans with type 2 diabetes.
        ].
      • In order to reduce the risk of onset or to delay the progression of DR, individuals with diabetes should be treated to achieve optimal control of blood pressure (e.g. < 130/80 mm Hg) [Level 1 for type 1 diabetes
        • Klein R.
        • Klein B.E.
        • Moss S.E.
        • Cruickshanks K.J.
        The Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy: XVII The 14-year incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy and associated risk factors in type 1 diabetes.
        • Klein R.
        • Moss S.E.
        • Klein B.E.
        • Davis M.D.
        • DeMets D.L.
        The Wisconsin epidemiologic study of diabetic retinopathy XI. The incidence of macular edema.
        ; Level 2 for type 2 diabetes
        UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) Group
        Intensive blood-glucose control with sulphonylureas or insulin compared with conventional treatment and risk of complications in patients with type 2 diabetes (UKPDS 33).
        • Chew E.Y.
        • Ambrosius W.T.
        • Davis M.D.
        • et al.
        ACCORD Study Group; ACCORD Eye Study Group
        Effects of medical therapies on retinopathy progression in type 2 diabetes.
        ADVANCE Collaborative Group
        ADVANCE – Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: patient recruitment and characteristics of the study population at baseline.
        ].

      Treatment Modalities

      Treatment of macular edema

      Key Messages

      • There is increasing evidence that intraocular injections of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors are an effective treatment for DME and produce a larger gain in vision than focal or grid laser alone.
      • Intraocular injection of steroid results in rapid resolution of DME; however, the improvement is not sustained and is associated with a significant increase in the incidence of raised intraocular pressure and cataract. For pseudophakic patients, visual acuity improvements may approach those of anti-VEGF therapies.

      Recommendations

      • Eyes that demonstrate clinically significant macular edema by ETDRS criteria without central macular thickening should receive focal laser [Level 1
        Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study Research Group
        Photocoagulation for diabetic macular edema Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study Report Number 1.
        ]; however, eyes with central macular thickening should be considered for treatment with a VEGF inhibitor alone or in conjunction with focal laser [Level 1 for ranibizumab
        • Nguyen Q.D.
        • Shah S.M.
        • Khwaja A.A.
        • et al.
        READ-2 Study Group
        Two-year outcomes of the ranibizumab for edema of the macula in diabetes (READ-2) study.
        • Mitchell P.
        • Bandello F.
        • Schmidt-Erfurth U.
        • et al.
        RESTORE study group
        The RESTORE study: ranibizumab monotherapy or combined with laser versus laser monotherapy for diabetic macular edema.
        ; Level 2 for bevacizumab
        • Michaelides M.
        • Kaines A.
        • Hamilton R.D.
        • Fraser-Bell S.
        • et al.
        A prospective randomized trial of intravitreal bevacizumab or laser therapy in the management of diabetic macular edema (BOLT study) 12-month data: report 2.
        ].
      • Eyes that demonstrate evidence of vitreomacular traction and macular edema should be considered for vitrectomy [Level 1
        • Haller J.A.
        • Qin H.
        • Apte R.S.
        • et al.
        Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network Writing Committee
        Vitrectomy outcomes in eyes with diabetic macular edema and vitreomacular traction.
        • Flaxel C.J.
        • Edwards A.R.
        • Aiello L.P.
        • et al.
        Factors associated with visual acuity outcomes after vitrectomy for diabetic macular edema: diabetic retinopathy clinical research network.
        ].

      Treatment of proliferative retinopathy

      Key Messages

      • Patients should be advised that field loss may occur after panretinal photocoagulation (PRP), but most patients are able to maintain fields sufficient for driving following routine PRP.
      • Macular edema may develop following PRP, but resolves by 6 months in the majority of eyes.
      • The addition of an injection of VEGF inhibitor to PRP increases short-term neovascular regression rates.

      Recommendations

      • In eyes with Diabetic Retinopathy Study (DRS) high-risk characteristics, PRP should be carried out to reduce the risk of severe vision loss [Level 1
        Diabetic Retinopathy Study Research Group
        Photocoagulation treatment of proliferative diabetic retinopathy Clinical applications of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (DRS) findings, DRS Report Number 8.
        ].
      • In eyes with proliferative retinopathy and centre-involving macular edema, an intraocular VEGF inhibitor injection should be considered at the time of PRP to improve the near-term vision result [Level 1 for ranibizumab
        • Googe J.
        • Brucker A.J.
        • Bressler N.M.
        • Qin H.
        • Aiello L.P.
        • Antoszyk A.
        • et al.
        Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network
        Randomized trial evaluating short-term effects of intravitreal ranibizumab or triamcinolone acetonide on macular edema after focal/grid laser for diabetic macular edema in eyes also receiving panretinal photocoagulation.
        ; Level 2 for bevacizumab
        • Cho W.B.
        • Oh S.B.
        • Moon J.W.
        • Kim H.C.
        Panretinal photocoagulation combined with intravitreal bevacizumab in high-risk proliferative diabetic retinopathy.
        ].
      • Consideration should be given to vitrectomy in eyes with nonclearing vitreous hemorrhage [Level 1
        Diabetic Retinopathy Vitrectomy Study Research Group
        Early vitrectomy for severe vitreous hemorrhage in diabetic retinopathy Four-year results of a randomized trial: Diabetic Retinopathy Vitrectomy Study Report 5.
        ], macular heterotopia [Level 3
        • Sato Y.
        • Shimada H.
        • Aso S.
        • Matsui M.
        Vitrectomy for diabetic macular heterotopia.
        ], or tractional macular detachment [Level 3
        • Flynn Jr, H.W.
        • Chew E.Y.
        • Simons B.D.
        • Barton F.B.
        • Remaley N.A.
        • Ferris 3rd, F.L.
        Pars plana vitrectomy in the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study ETDRS report number 17. The Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study Research Group.
        • Thompson J.T.
        • de Bustros S.
        • Michels R.G.
        • Rice T.A.
        Results and prognostic factors in vitrectomy for diabetic traction retinal detachment of the macula.
        ], tractional rhegmatogenous detachment, [Level 3
        • Thompson J.T.
        • de Bustros S.
        • Michels R.G.
        • Rice T.A.
        Results and prognostic factors in vitrectomy for diabetic traction – rhegmatogenous retinal detachment.
        • Yang C.M.
        • Su P.Y.
        • Yeh P.T.
        • Chen M.S.
        Combined rhegmatogenous and traction retinal detachment in proliferative diabetic retinopathy: clinical manifestations and surgical outcome.
        ] or dense premacular hemorrhage [Level 3
        • O'Hanley G.P.
        • Canny C.L.
        Diabetic dense premacular hemorrhage A possible indication for prompt vitrectomy.
        • Ramsay R.C.
        • Knobloch W.H.
        • Cantrill H.L.
        Timing of vitrectomy for active proliferative diabetic retinopathy.
        ].
      • In eyes with active PDR undergoing vitrectomy, VEGF inhibitors should be considered preoperatively to reduce hemorrhage and complications associated with vitrectomy [Level 2 for bevacizumab
        • Ahmadieh H.
        • Shoeibi N.
        • Entezari M.
        • Monshizadeh R.
        Intravitreal bevacizumab for prevention of early postvitrectomy hemorrhage in diabetic patients: a randomized clinical trial.
        • di Lauro R.
        • De Ruggiero P.
        • di Lauro R.
        • di Lauro M.T.
        • Romano M.R.
        Intravitreal bevacizumab for surgical treatment of severe proliferative diabetic retinopathy.
        • Modarres M.
        • Nazari H.
        • Falavarjani K.G.
        • Naseripour M.
        • Hashemi M.
        • Parvaresh M.M.
        Intravitreal injection of bevacizumab before vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy.
        • Rizzo S.
        • Genovesi-Ebert F.
        • Di Bartolo E.
        • Vento A.
        • Miniaci S.
        • Williams G.
        Injection of intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin) as a preoperative adjunct before vitrectomy surgery in the treatment of severe proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR).
        ].

      Pregnancy

      Key Message

      • There is insufficient evidence available to determine the safety of intraocular VEGF inhibitors during pregnancy. Thus, caution should be exercised if using them in women who are pregnant or could become pregnant. Women of child-bearing age should be questioned specifically about possible pregnancy during pretreatment evaluation.

      Recommendation

      • Patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who are considering pregnancy should be counselled to undergo an ophthalmic evaluation by an eye care specialist before attempting to conceive. Repeat assessments should be performed during the first trimester and as indicated by the stage of retinopathy and the rate of progression during the remainder of pregnancy and through the first year postpartum [Level 1 for type 1 diabetes
        Diabetes Control and Complications Trial Research Group
        Effect of pregnancy on microvascular complications in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial.
        Diabetes Control and Complication Trial Research Group
        Early worsening of diabetic retinopathy in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial.
        and Consensus for type 2 diabetes].

      Neovascularization Of The Iris

      Key Message

      • In patients with DR and iris neovascularization or neovascular glaucoma, consideration should be given to VEGF inhibitor injection in conjunction with PRP to produce regression of the neovasularization and reduce the risk of long-term glaucoma.

      Economic Considerations

      Key Message

      • Available evidence suggests that there are considerable economic benefits to screening and early treatment of DR.

      References

        • Canadian Ophthalmological Society Clinical Practice Guideline Expert Committee
        Canadian Ophthalmological Society evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the periodic eye examination in adults in Canada.
        Can J Ophthalmol. 2007; 42 (158-63): 39-45
        • Canadian Ophthalmological Society Cataract Surgery Clinical Practice Guideline Expert Committee
        Canadian Ophthalmological Society evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for cataract surgery in the adult eye.
        Can J Ophthalmol. 2008; 43: S7-S57
        • Canadian Ophthalmological Society Glaucoma Clinical Practice Guideline Expert Committee
        Canadian Ophthalmological Society evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the management of glaucoma in the adult eye.
        Can J Ophthalmol. 2009; 44: S7-S93
        • Canadian Diabetes Association Clinical Practice Guideline Expert Committee
        Canadian Diabetes Association clinical practice guidelines for the prevention and management of diabetes in Canada.
        Can J Diabetes. 2008; 32: S1-S201
        • Canadian Hypertension Education Program
        2008 CHEP Recommendations for the Management of Hypertension.
        (Accessed December 15, 2011)
      1. Public Health Agency of Canada. Diabetes in Canada: Facts and Figures from a Public Health Perspective. Ottawa, ON: 2011.
        (Accessed January 3, 2012)
        • Naqshbandi M.
        • Harris S.B.
        • Esler J.G.
        • Antwi-Nsiah F.
        Global complication rates of type 2 diabetes in Indigenous peoples: A comprehensive review.
        Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2008; 82: 1-17
        • Macaulay A.C.
        • Montour L.T.
        • Adelson N.
        Prevalence of diabetic and atherosclerotic complications among Mohawk Indians of Kahnawake, PQ.
        CMAJ. 1988; 139: 221-224
        • Sloan F.A.
        • Brown D.S.
        • Carlisle E.S.
        • Picone G.A.
        • Lee P.P.
        Monitoring visual status: why patients do or do not comply with practice guidelines.
        Health Serv Res. 2004; 39: 1429-1448
        • Boucher M.C.
        • Desroches G.
        • Garcia-Salinas R.
        • et al.
        Teleophthalmology screening for diabetic retinopathy through mobile imaging units within Canada.
        Can J Ophthalmol. 2008; 43: 658-668
        • Rudnisky C.J.
        • Tennant M.T.S.
        • Johnson J.A.
        • Balko S.U.
        Diabetes and eye disease in Alberta.
        in: Johnson J.A. Alberta Diabetes Atlas 2009. Institute of Health Economics, Edmonton, AB2009: 153-173
        • Klein R.
        • Klein B.
        • Moss S.
        • Davis M.D.
        • DeMets D.L.
        The Wisconsin epidemiologic study of diabetic retinopathy.
        Arch Ophthalmol. 1984; 102: 520-526
        • Raman V.
        • Campbell F.
        • Holland P.
        • et al.
        Retinopathy screening in children and adolescents with diabetes.
        Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2002; 958: 387-389
        • Goldstein D.E.
        • Blinder K.J.
        • Ide C.H.
        • et al.
        Glycemic control and development of retinopathy in youth-onset insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.
        Ophthalmology. 1993; 100: 1125-1131
        • Klein R.
        • Klein B.
        • Moss S.
        • Davis M.D.
        • DeMets D.L.
        The Wisconsin epidemiologic study of diabetic retinopathy.
        Arch Ophthalmol. 1984; 102: 527-532
        • Klein R.
        • Klein B.E.
        • Moss S.E.
        • et al.
        The Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of diabetic retinopathy.
        Arch Ophthalmol. 1989; 107: 244-249
        • Mohamed Q.
        • Gillies M.C.
        • Wong T.Y.
        Management of diabetic retinopathy: a systematic review.
        JAMA. 2007; 298: 902-916
        • Misra A.
        • Bachmann M.O.
        • Greenwood R.H.
        • et al.
        Trends in yield and effects of screening intervals during 17 years of a large UK community-based diabetic retinopathy screening programme.
        Diabet Med. 2009; 26: 1040-1047
        • Mitchell P.
        The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy: a study of 1300 diabetics from Newcastle and the Hunter Valley.
        Aust J Ophthalmol. 1980; 8: 241-246
        • Tennant M.T.
        • Greve M.D.
        • Rudnisky C.J.
        • Hillson T.R.
        • Hinz B.J.
        Identification of diabetic retinopathy by stereoscopic digital imaging via teleophthalmology: a comparison to slide film.
        Can J Ophthalmol. 2001; 36: 187-196
        • Boucher M.C.
        • Gresset J.A.
        • Angioi K.
        • Olivier S.
        Effectiveness and safety of screening for diabetic retinopathy with two nonmydriatic digital images compared with the seven standard stereoscopic photographic fields.
        Can J Ophthalmol. 2003; 38: 557-568
        • Rudnisky C.J.
        • Tennant M.T.
        • Weis E.
        • Ting A.
        • Hinz B.J.
        • Greve M.D.
        Web-based grading of compressed stereoscopic digital photography versus standard slide film photography for the diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy.
        Ophthalmology. 2007; 114: 1748-1754
        • Nguyen Q.D.
        • Shah S.M.
        • Khwaja A.A.
        • et al.
        • READ-2 Study Group
        Two-year outcomes of the ranibizumab for edema of the macula in diabetes (READ-2) study.
        Ophthalmology. 2010; 117: 2146-2151
        • Mitchell P.
        • Bandello F.
        • Schmidt-Erfurth U.
        • et al.
        • RESTORE study group
        The RESTORE study: ranibizumab monotherapy or combined with laser versus laser monotherapy for diabetic macular edema.
        Ophthalmology. 2011; 118: 615-625
        • Michaelides M.
        • Kaines A.
        • Hamilton R.D.
        • Fraser-Bell S.
        • et al.
        A prospective randomized trial of intravitreal bevacizumab or laser therapy in the management of diabetic macular edema (BOLT study) 12-month data: report 2.
        Ophthalmology. 2010; 117: 1078-1086
        • Diabetic Retinopathy Vitrectomy Study Research Group
        Early vitrectomy for severe vitreous hemorrhage in diabetic retinopathy. Two-year results of a randomized trial. Diabetic Retinopathy Vitrectomy Study report 2.
        Arch Ophthalmol. 1985; 103: 1644-1652
        • Haller J.A.
        • Qin H.
        • Apte R.S.
        • et al.
        • Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network Writing Committee
        Vitrectomy outcomes in eyes with diabetic macular edema and vitreomacular traction.
        Ophthalmology. 2010; 117: 1087-1093
        • Flaxel C.J.
        • Edwards A.R.
        • Aiello L.P.
        • et al.
        Factors associated with visual acuity outcomes after vitrectomy for diabetic macular edema: diabetic retinopathy clinical research network.
        Retina. 2010; 30: 1488-1495
        • Diabetes Control and Complications Trial Research Group
        Effect of pregnancy on microvascular complications in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial.
        Diabetes Care. 2000; 23: 1084-1091
        • Diabetes Control and Complication Trial Research Group
        Early worsening of diabetic retinopathy in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial.
        Arch Ophthalmol. 1998; 116: 874-886
        • Sugimoto Y.
        • Mochizuki H.
        • Okumichi H.
        • Takumida M.
        • Takamatsu M.
        • Kawamata S.
        • Kiuchi Y.
        Effect of intravitreal bevacizumab on iris vessels in neovascular glaucoma patients.
        Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2010; 248: 1601-1609
        • Falavarjani K.G.
        • Modarres M.
        • Nazari H.
        Therapeutic effect of bevacizumab injected into the silicone oil in eyes with neovascular glaucoma after vitrectomy for advanced diabetic retinopathy.
        Eye (Lond.). 2010; 24: 717-719
        • Beutel J.
        • Peters S.
        • Lüke M.
        • Aisenbrey S.
        • Szurman P.
        • Spitzer M.S.
        • et al.
        • Bevacizumab Study Group
        Bevacizumab as adjuvant for neovascular glaucoma.
        Acta Ophthalmol. 2010; 88: 103-109
        • Lupinacci A.P.
        • Calzada J.I.
        • Rafieetery M.
        • Charles S.
        • Netland P.A.
        Clinical outcomes of patients with anterior segment neovascularization treated with or without intraocular bevacizumab.
        Adv Ther. 2009; 26: 208-216
        • Maberley D.
        • Walker H.
        • Koushik A.
        • Cruess A.
        Screening for diabetic retinopathy in James Bay, Ontario: a cost-effectiveness analysis.
        CMAJ. 2003; 168: 160-164
        • Polak B.C.
        • Crijns H.
        • Casparie A.F.
        • Niessen L.W.
        Cost-effectiveness of glycemic control and ophthalmological care in diabetic retinopathy.
        Health Policy. 2003; 64: 89-97
        • Younis N.
        • Broadbent D.M.
        • Vora J.P.
        • Harding S.P.
        Liverpool Diabetic Eye Study.
        Lancet. 2003; 361: 195-200
        • Klein R.
        • Klein B.E.
        • Moss S.E.
        • Cruickshanks K.J.
        The Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy: XVII.
        Ophthalmology. 1998; 105: 1801-1815
        • Diabetes Control and Complications Trial Research Group
        The effect of intensive treatment of diabetes on the development and progression of long-term complications in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.
        N Engl J Med. 1993; 329: 977-986
        • UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) Group
        Intensive blood-glucose control with sulphonylureas or insulin compared with conventional treatment and risk of complications in patients with type 2 diabetes (UKPDS 33).
        Lancet. 1998; 352: 837-853
        • Chew E.Y.
        • Ambrosius W.T.
        • Davis M.D.
        • et al.
        • ACCORD Study Group; ACCORD Eye Study Group
        Effects of medical therapies on retinopathy progression in type 2 diabetes.
        N Engl J Med. 2010; 363: 233-244
        • ADVANCE Collaborative Group
        ADVANCE – Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: patient recruitment and characteristics of the study population at baseline.
        Diabet Med. 2005; 22: 882-888
        • Duckworth W.
        • Abraira C.
        • Moritz T.
        • et al.
        • VADT Investigators
        Glucose control and vascular complications in veterans with type 2 diabetes.
        N Engl J Med. 2009; 360: 129-139
        • Klein R.
        • Moss S.E.
        • Klein B.E.
        • Davis M.D.
        • DeMets D.L.
        The Wisconsin epidemiologic study of diabetic retinopathy.
        Ophthalmology. 1989; 96: 1501-1510
        • Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study Research Group
        Photocoagulation for diabetic macular edema.
        Arch Ophthalmol. 1985; 103: 1796-1806
        • Diabetic Retinopathy Study Research Group
        Photocoagulation treatment of proliferative diabetic retinopathy.
        Ophthalmology. 1981; 88: 583-600
        • Googe J.
        • Brucker A.J.
        • Bressler N.M.
        • Qin H.
        • Aiello L.P.
        • Antoszyk A.
        • et al.
        • Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network
        Randomized trial evaluating short-term effects of intravitreal ranibizumab or triamcinolone acetonide on macular edema after focal/grid laser for diabetic macular edema in eyes also receiving panretinal photocoagulation.
        Retina. 2011; 31: 1009-1027
        • Cho W.B.
        • Oh S.B.
        • Moon J.W.
        • Kim H.C.
        Panretinal photocoagulation combined with intravitreal bevacizumab in high-risk proliferative diabetic retinopathy.
        Retina. 2009; 29: 516-522
        • Diabetic Retinopathy Vitrectomy Study Research Group
        Early vitrectomy for severe vitreous hemorrhage in diabetic retinopathy.
        Arch Ophthalmol. 1990; 108: 958-964
        • Sato Y.
        • Shimada H.
        • Aso S.
        • Matsui M.
        Vitrectomy for diabetic macular heterotopia.
        Ophthalmology. 1994; 101: 63-67
        • Flynn Jr, H.W.
        • Chew E.Y.
        • Simons B.D.
        • Barton F.B.
        • Remaley N.A.
        • Ferris 3rd, F.L.
        Pars plana vitrectomy in the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study.
        Ophthalmology. 1992; 99: 1351-1357
        • Thompson J.T.
        • de Bustros S.
        • Michels R.G.
        • Rice T.A.
        Results and prognostic factors in vitrectomy for diabetic traction retinal detachment of the macula.
        Arch Ophthalmol. 1987; 105: 497-502
        • Thompson J.T.
        • de Bustros S.
        • Michels R.G.
        • Rice T.A.
        Results and prognostic factors in vitrectomy for diabetic traction – rhegmatogenous retinal detachment.
        Arch Ophthalmol. 1987; 105: 503-507
        • Yang C.M.
        • Su P.Y.
        • Yeh P.T.
        • Chen M.S.
        Combined rhegmatogenous and traction retinal detachment in proliferative diabetic retinopathy: clinical manifestations and surgical outcome.
        Can J Ophthalmol. 2008; 43: 192-198
        • O'Hanley G.P.
        • Canny C.L.
        Diabetic dense premacular hemorrhage.
        Ophthalmology. 1985; 92: 507-511
        • Ramsay R.C.
        • Knobloch W.H.
        • Cantrill H.L.
        Timing of vitrectomy for active proliferative diabetic retinopathy.
        Ophthalmology. 1986; 93: 283-289
        • Ahmadieh H.
        • Shoeibi N.
        • Entezari M.
        • Monshizadeh R.
        Intravitreal bevacizumab for prevention of early postvitrectomy hemorrhage in diabetic patients: a randomized clinical trial.
        Ophthalmology. 2009; 116: 1943-1948
        • di Lauro R.
        • De Ruggiero P.
        • di Lauro R.
        • di Lauro M.T.
        • Romano M.R.
        Intravitreal bevacizumab for surgical treatment of severe proliferative diabetic retinopathy.
        Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2010; 248: 785-791
        • Modarres M.
        • Nazari H.
        • Falavarjani K.G.
        • Naseripour M.
        • Hashemi M.
        • Parvaresh M.M.
        Intravitreal injection of bevacizumab before vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy.
        Eur J Ophthalmol. 2009; 19: 848-852
        • Rizzo S.
        • Genovesi-Ebert F.
        • Di Bartolo E.
        • Vento A.
        • Miniaci S.
        • Williams G.
        Injection of intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin) as a preoperative adjunct before vitrectomy surgery in the treatment of severe proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR).
        Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2008; 246: 837-842