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The 20/20 patient who can’t read

      Abstract

      To understand how reading can be disrupted in patients with good acuity, it is important to realize the complexities that underlie this task, which normally seems so effortless. The process of reading is an interplay among vision, eye movements, attention, and linguistic processing, and impairments in any of these functions can result in reduced reading efficiency. The goal of this review is to provide a systematic review of these functions that can help clinicians generate a logical and useful differential diagnosis of impaired reading in the patient with 20/20 vision.

      Résumé

      Pour comprendre les troubles de lecture chez des patients ayant une bonne vision, il est important de saisir la complexité d’une telle action, qui semble se faire habituellement sans effort. La lecture fait appel à la vision, aux mouvements des yeux, à l’attention et au traitement linguistique. Une déficience d’une seule de ces fonctions peut diminuer l’efficacité de la lecture. Le présent article vise à passer systématiquement en revue ces fonctions pour aider les cliniciens à poser un diagnostic différentiel logique et utile des troubles de lecture chez un patient ayant une acuité de 20/20.
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